Smartness? Between Discourse and Practice

'Smart' Urban Heritage Management

Linda Shetabi: University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Lucille Tetley-Brown: University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

 

KEYWORDS: Urban, Heritage, Management, Historic, Conservation

The historic fabric which represents a city’s evolution and development is increasingly viewed as a set of assets that enhance the urban experience. These assets can create a sense of place, foster stronger communities, or help define unique identities that boost the urban economy by attracting investment in businesses, urban renewal projects and redevelopment opportunities. However, the unprecedented rise in urbanization trends has placed increased pressures on cities to utilize resources more efficiently, balancing development needs and carbon reduction targets while maintaining some of the historic fabric. It has therefore become imperative to manage heritage assets effectively and sensitively so that these continue to retain value and remain relevant to current and future generations.

This session aims to explore how urban heritage can be managed and maintained in a smart city. The range of questions the session seeks to explore includes, but is not limited to: How might smart technologies inform heritage policy? What smart tools are currently used and how have they assisted in managing urban heritage? How do these tools and technologies connect the intangible values associated with historic fabric to an increasing global population? How can information communication technologies, internet applications and other smart tools be used in view of budgetary constraints? What lessons have been learned and how can they be used to inform urban policy for an increasingly mixed range of pre- and post-1940’s urban fabric?

PAPERS IN THE SESSION (ORDER OF PRESENTATION IS TO BE DETERMINED BY CHAIRS)

The city as a smart museum without walls

  • Hannah Lewi, University of Melbourne, Australia

The Adaptive Reuse of Cultural Heritage in Amsterdam Smart City: Revealing its challenges and solutions

  • Nadia Pintossi, Ana Roders, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands

Merging Smart and Affordable in Urban Heritage Management and Presentation: The Exhibition of Built Heritage of Niš, Serbia

  • Branislav Antonić, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Public ecologies: urban conservation after sustainability

  • Ellen Dineen Grimes, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, United States of America

Smart Communities for Global Heritage Cities: Innovative Community Engagement Tools for Historic Urban Landscapes

  • Deniz Ikiz Kaya, Ozyegin University, Turkey

 

Making the City Smart Together

Jonas Breuer: imec-SMIT/Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Shenja Van der Graaf: imec-SMIT/Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

 

KEYWORDS: Smart City, Smart Citizenship, Participatory Design, Co-creation

With the recent ‘smartening up’ of our cities, and public sphere generally, ICT in its various manifestations has become paramount to the governance, operation and experience of the urban. ICT, increasingly associated or interchangeably used with algorithms and artificial intelligence, draws attention to how public space is ‘translated’ into ‘code’, and how ‘code’ is said to ‘reshape’ public sphere (Kicthin, Dodge, 2011). In this view, the smart city imaginary, with a distinct set of rationalities, has become a recurring theme within critical urban geography (White, 2016; cf. Mansell, 2012), centre-staging digital technologies to tackle complex urban issues with a focus on pragmatic and functional aspects related to efficiency, safety and the like, conjoined by questions and critiques about privacy, control and ownership, but shaped mainly by mere solutionist visions unable to address the underlying complexity of issues at hand.

Against this backdrop, we seek to further the critical debate about smart citizenship and the role of citizens, urging cities and governments, at minimum, to anticipate and mitigate (un)intended consequences when the ‘human outlook’ is downplayed. We put forward the notions of participatory design and co-creation to further investigate what we consider to be a weakness in understanding today’s smart cities. A structured perspective is missing on how to systematically involve citizens, and achieve an equilibrium between diverse interests involved in the complex multi-actor and multi-sector setting of the city. Here, assigning an active, co-equal and structural role to all actors remains challenging in practice, despite the wide range of available technologies and digital public services.

This session seeks to discuss systematical involvement of citizens through participatory design and co-creation approaches. We encourage participants to explore existing concepts, propose new ones at a theoretical level, or to present a meaningful empirical case study that showcases the application of a related concept.

PAPERS IN THE SESSION (ORDER OF PRESENTATION IS TO BE DETERMINED BY CHAIRS)

Co-creating a practical vision on the Smart City

  • Nils Walravens, SMIT, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Participatory action research for the development of e-inclusive smart cities

  • Nils Walravens, Ilse Mariën, SMIT Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Data accessibility, visualization and co-interpretation processes as the new urban commons

  • George Artopoulos, The Cyprus Institute, Cyprus

Civic Data & Smart Citizenship in Midwest Urban Contexts

  • T. F. Tierney, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, United States of America

 

Open Panel #1

Juliette Bekkering: Architectural Design and Engineering , TU EIndhoveN

 

PAPERS IN THE SESSION (ORDER OF PRESENTATION IS TO BE DETERMINED BY CHAIRS)

Soft Sibylations: GPS Navigation as urban speculation

  • Benjamin William Tippin, Torrance Art Museum, United States of America

Smart Spaces – Spatialized Smartness

  • Radostina Radulova-Stahmer, TU Graz, Austria

The IdIoT in the SMART Home

  • Delfina Fantini van Ditmar, Design Products Programme, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom

 

Open Panel #2

Jacob Voorthuis: Architecture History and Theory, TU EIndhoveN

 

PAPERS IN THE SESSION (ORDER OF PRESENTATION IS TO BE DETERMINED BY CHAIRS)

Standing out in a crowd: Big Data to produce new forms of publicness (withdrawn)

  • Silvio Carta, Rebecca Onafuye, University of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

Smartness, Otherwise Considered: Gordon Pask’s Course on Information Environments (c.1980) and Alternative Models of Smartness (withdrawn)

  • Dulmini Perera, Dessau Institute of Architecture, Anhalt University of Applied Sciences, Germany

New Sensorial Vehicles - Navigating Critical Understandings of Autonomous Futures

  • Fiona McDermott, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

Dronesphere: Competing Aerial Imaginaries

  • Simon James Rabyniuk, University of Toronto, Canada

 

Open Panel #3

Pieter van Wesemael: Urbanism and Urban Architecture, TU EIndhoveN

 

PAPERS IN THE SESSION (ORDER OF PRESENTATION IS TO BE DETERMINED BY CHAIRS)

INTERVAL strategies for a better urban environment

  • Juan Corral, INTERVAL, United Kingdom

Urban Commons: mapping alternative futures (WITHDRAWN)

  • Ana Betancour, Carl-Johan Vesterlund, Umeå University, Sweden

Reusability and Sustainibility of the built environment as a part of a political project

  • Charlott Greub, North Dakota State University, Fargo, United States of America

Aesthetic Perspectives to Urban Technologies: Outlining the Experiential Sustainability of Smart City Solutions

  • Sanna Lehtinen, Vesa Vihanninjoki, University of Helsinki, Finland

 

Open Panel #4

Vesa Vihanninjoki and Sanna Lehtinen, University of Helsinki, Finland

 

PAPERS IN THE SESSION (ORDER OF PRESENTATION IS TO BE DETERMINED BY CHAIRS)

Hypertypes: From Social Bridges to an Urbanism of Aspirations, Affordances and Capabilities

  • Shin Alexandre Koseki, ETH Zurich

Evaluation of Public Space Design Intervention in Neighborhood Parks in Bandung’s Ex-Colonial Settlement

  • Dimas Hartawan Wicaksono, Universitas Katolik Parahyangan, Indonesia

The uselessness as an inspiration: micro-scale interventions as a way to restore the public sphere in Rio de Janeiro

  • Priscila Gonçalves Santos, UFRJ, Brazil

Mapping the Vision of Hope and Fear: why are representations of the European city space 1450-1650 relevant today

  • Gordana Korolija Fontana-Giusti, University of Kent, United Kingdom